Coheed and Cambria's "The Color Before the Sun"

Words by Kinseli Jazz Baricuatro

New York based band, Coheed and Cambria are known by fans to release concept albums following lead singer Claudio Sanchez’s comic book series The Army Wars. After eight consecutive concept albums, The Color Before the Sun steps away from this storyline and gives the band a certain sense of freedom and expansion as they step into a new direction.**

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The opening track, “Island” gives the album a good push towards momentum, without draining all its energy out at once. With quality lyrics paired with an almost pop like melody, carried with tight set drums and subtle yet significant bass, creates a great start to the album. The end of the track causes a smooth transition for “Eraser”, which in a sense almost feels like a continuation of the first track with a just as upbeat feel, yet a slightly rougher tone. “Colors” is the track that finally slows the album down a notch, without being too droning. “Here to Mars” is perhaps one of the most climactic songs on the album, almost reaching the middle of the album it is well placed in relation to the other tracks. However, it is almost duly followed by one of the slower songs on the album called “Ghost”. Although the name fits the vibe of the song, the placement of this would be better fitted a bit more towards the end, rather than the very middle of the album. The complete second half of the album consists of straight head bangers and sure to be crowd pleasers when played live. The last track “Peace to the Mountain” gives the album the finale it deserves, with a chorus that builds both vocally and instrumentally.

Being a band for nearly 20 years and consistently sticking to the concept theme for the majority of it, The Color Before the Sun creates a sense of relatability that makes it easier to follow, while also giving the audience a deeper look into Claudio Sanchez’s personal life. New and old fans alike will enjoy this album for its upbeat personality, tight structures, and climatic rises.

**Recommended Tracks:  “Here to Mars” “Peace to the Mountain”

Album Rating: 7.4/10